Rice Fest Hawaii 2014 Gallery (Frolic Hawaii)

Rice Fest Hawaii 2014 (Frolic Hawaii)

Source: Frolic Hawaii

Rice Fest Hawaii 2014 (Frolic Hawaii)Rice Fest Hawaii 2014 (Photo Credit: Tracy Chan – Frolic Hawaii)

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5th Annual Rice Festival, Sept. 28 (Photo Gallery)

5th Annual Rice Festival, Sept. 28 (Photo Gallery) (Hawaii News Now)

Source: Honolulu Star-Advertiser

5th Annual Rice Festival, Sept. 28 (Photo Gallery)
5th Annual Rice Festival, Sept. 28 (Photo Credit: Bruce Asato – Honolulu Star Advertiser)

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Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (Hawaii News Now)

Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (Hawaii News Now)

Source: KHON

HONOLULU (AP) – A group is claiming a world record for a popular Hawaii dish, after putting together a massive bowl of rice, hamburger, eggs and gravy.

Chef Hideaki Miyoshi of Tokkuri Tei restaurant and volunteers at Sunday’s Fifth Annual Rice Festival assembled a bowl of loco moco that weighed 1,126 pounds.

Loco moco was invented in the late 1940s in Hilo. There are varieties, but the basic dish consists of hot white rice, a hamburger patty, an over-easy fried egg and brown gravy.

Guinness World Records said the dish would have to weigh at least 1,100 pounds for consideration.

Miyoshi and his crew used more than 600 pounds of rice, 200 pounds of ground beef, 300 scrambled eggs and 200 pounds of gravy. They used donated rice and borrowed kitchen space at Ward Centers.

The festival holds the Guinness World Record for making a 286-pound Spam musubi in 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/1uwSc9Z ).

The big loco moco took 3½ hours to prepare and then was donated to charity to feed the homeless, organizer Lincoln Jacobe said.

Some loco-moco purists were critical of the use of scrambled eggs instead of over-easy eggs.

“If you order at a restaurant, they ask you how you want your egg,” Cesar Panocillo said. “So I guess it’s a preference. Some people might like it scrambled.”

The event also featured a Spam-musubi eating contest. Randy Javelosa beat four-time champion Ron Lee by eating seven of the canned meat, dried seaweed and rice snack in two minutes.

“I just tried to scarf it down and keep it down,” said Javelosa, whose prize was a year’s worth of free rice.

“I’ll be back next year,” Lee vowed.

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Visitors celebrate 5th Annual Rice Fest (KITV)

Visitors celebrate 5th Annual Rice Fest (KITV)

Source: KITV

Not everyone went for a bike ride this morning. Some saved their energy to hit up the 5th Annual Rice Fest! Visitors celebrated all things rice-related including lots of rice inspired dishes prepared by local vendors. And the event didn’t go without a challenge. Some hungry participants sat down for a musubi eating contest… And speaking of challenges – there was a new Guinness World Record set for the largest Loco Moco! The dish weighed in at about 1,126 pounds– beating the record by 26 pounds!

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Hawaii’s favorite grain celebrated at this year’s Rice Fest (KHON)

Hawaii’s favorite grain celebrated at this year’s Rice Fest (KHON)

Source: KHON

The 5th Annual Rice Fest took over Auahi Street at Ward Warehouse on Sunday.

Headlining the event, the first ever attempt to set the Guinness world-record for the largest loco-moco.

It’s expected to weigh more than 1,100 pounds.

There was also a Spam musubi eating contest.

Rice Fest organizers were inspired to create this event by the mixture of cultures in Hawaii.

“I guess ’cause we are in Hawaii, all the cultures, they use rice,” Edward Sugimoto, co-founder of Rice Fest, said. “Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans, everybody uses rice, I figured. Especially in Hawaii, it’s a great place for the melting pot. Everyone shares rice with others. It’s all love.”

KHON2’s very own Manolo Morales helped host some of the rice demonstrations.

The event was also a benefit for the Lanakila “Meals on Wheels” program.

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Group claims world record with 1,126-pound Hawaii dish (10News Tampa – WTSP)

Group claims world record with 1,126-pound Hawaii dish (10News Tampa – WTSP)

Source: 10News Tampa – WTSP

Associated Press

HONOLULU – A group is claiming a world record for a popular Hawaii dish, after putting together a massive bowl of rice, hamburger, eggs and gravy.

Chef Hideaki Miyoshi of Tokkuri Tei restaurant and volunteers at Sunday’s Fifth Annual Rice Festival assembled a bowl of loco moco that weighed 1,126 pounds.

Loco moco was invented in the late 1940s in Hilo. There are varieties, but the basic dish consists of hot white rice, a hamburger patty, an over-easy fried egg and brown gravy.

Guinness World Records said the dish would have to weigh at least 1,100 pounds for consideration.

Miyoshi and his crew used more than 600 pounds of rice, 200 pounds of ground beef, 300 scrambled eggs and 200 pounds of gravy. They used donated rice and borrowed kitchen space at Ward Centers.

The festival holds the Guinness World Record for making a 286-pound Spam musubi in 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/1uwSc9Z ).

The big loco moco took 3½ hours to prepare and then was donated to charity to feed the homeless, organizer Lincoln Jacobe said.

Some loco-moco purists were critical of the use of scrambled eggs instead of over-easy eggs.

“If you order at a restaurant, they ask you how you want your egg,” Cesar Panocillo said. “So I guess it’s a preference. Some people might like it scrambled.”

The event also featured a Spam-musubi eating contest. Randy Javelosa beat four-time champion Ron Lee by eating seven of the canned meat, dried seaweed and rice snack in two minutes.

“I just tried to scarf it down and keep it down,” said Javelosa, whose price was a year’s worth of free rice.

“I’ll be back next year,” Lee vowed.

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Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (MSN)

Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (MSN)

Source: MSN

Associated Press

HONOLULU — A group is claiming a world record for a popular Hawaii dish, after putting together a massive bowl of rice, hamburger, eggs and gravy.

Chef Hideaki Miyoshi of Tokkuri Tei restaurant and volunteers at Sunday’s Fifth Annual Rice Festival assembled a bowl of loco moco that weighed 1,126 pounds.

Loco moco was invented in the late 1940s in Hilo. There are varieties, but the basic dish consists of hot white rice, a hamburger patty, an over-easy fried egg and brown gravy.

Guinness World Records said the dish would have to weigh at least 1,100 pounds for consideration.

Miyoshi and his crew used more than 600 pounds of rice, 200 pounds of ground beef, 300 scrambled eggs and 200 pounds of gravy. They used donated rice and borrowed kitchen space at Ward Centers.

The festival holds the Guinness World Record for making a 286-pound Spam musubi in 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/1uwSc9Z ).

The big loco moco took 3½ hours to prepare and then was donated to charity to feed the homeless, organizer Lincoln Jacobe said.

Some loco-moco purists were critical of the use of scrambled eggs instead of over-easy eggs.

“If you order at a restaurant, they ask you how you want your egg,” Cesar Panocillo said. “So I guess it’s a preference. Some people might like it scrambled.”

The event also featured a Spam-musubi eating contest. Randy Javelosa beat four-time champion Ron Lee by eating seven of the canned meat, dried seaweed and rice snack in two minutes.

“I just tried to scarf it down and keep it down,” said Javelosa, whose prize was a year’s worth of free rice.

“I’ll be back next year,” Lee vowed.

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Seeking immorality, chef, volunteers assemble 1,126-pound bowl of loco moco at Rice Festival (Fox News)

Seeking immorality, chef, volunteers assemble 1,126-pound bowl of loco moco at Rice Festival (Fox News)

Source: Fox News

Associated Press

HONOLULU – A group is claiming a world record for a popular Hawaii dish, after putting together a massive bowl of rice, hamburger, eggs and gravy.

Chef Hideaki Miyoshi of Tokkuri Tei restaurant and volunteers at Sunday’s Fifth Annual Rice Festival assembled a bowl of loco moco that weighed 1,126 pounds.

Loco moco was invented in the late 1940s in Hilo. There are varieties, but the basic dish consists of hot white rice, a hamburger patty, an over-easy fried egg and brown gravy.

Guinness World Records said the dish would have to weigh at least 1,100 pounds for consideration.

Miyoshi and his crew used more than 600 pounds of rice, 200 pounds of ground beef, 300 scrambled eggs and 200 pounds of gravy. They used donated rice and borrowed kitchen space at Ward Centers.

The festival holds the Guinness World Record for making a 286-pound Spam musubi in 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/1uwSc9Z ).

The big loco moco took 3½ hours to prepare and then was donated to charity to feed the homeless, organizer Lincoln Jacobe said.

Some loco-moco purists were critical of the use of scrambled eggs instead of over-easy eggs.

“If you order at a restaurant, they ask you how you want your egg,” Cesar Panocillo said. “So I guess it’s a preference. Some people might like it scrambled.”

The event also featured a Spam-musubi eating contest. Randy Javelosa beat four-time champion Ron Lee by eating seven of the canned meat, dried seaweed and rice snack in two minutes.

“I just tried to scarf it down and keep it down,” said Javelosa, whose price was a year’s worth of free rice.

“I’ll be back next year,” Lee vowed.

Posted in Media

Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (Miami Herald)

Crew makes 1,126-pound bowl of Hawaii rice dish (Miami Herald)

Source: Miami Herald

Associated Press

HONOLULU – A group is claiming a world record for a popular Hawaii dish, after putting together a massive bowl of rice, hamburger, eggs and gravy.

Chef Hideaki Miyoshi of Tokkuri Tei restaurant and volunteers at Sunday’s Fifth Annual Rice Festival assembled a bowl of loco moco that weighed 1,126 pounds.

Loco moco was invented in the late 1940s in Hilo. There are varieties, but the basic dish consists of hot white rice, a hamburger patty, an over-easy fried egg and brown gravy.

Guinness World Records said the dish would have to weigh at least 1,100 pounds for consideration.

Miyoshi and his crew used more than 600 pounds of rice, 200 pounds of ground beef, 300 scrambled eggs and 200 pounds of gravy. They used donated rice and borrowed kitchen space at Ward Centers.

The festival holds the Guinness World Record for making a 286-pound Spam musubi in 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/1uwSc9Z ).

The big loco moco took 3½ hours to prepare and then was donated to charity to feed the homeless, organizer Lincoln Jacobe said.

Some loco-moco purists were critical of the use of scrambled eggs instead of over-easy eggs.

“If you order at a restaurant, they ask you how you want your egg,” Cesar Panocillo said. “So I guess it’s a preference. Some people might like it scrambled.”

The event also featured a Spam-musubi eating contest. Randy Javelosa beat four-time champion Ron Lee by eating seven of the canned meat, dried seaweed and rice snack in two minutes.

“I just tried to scarf it down and keep it down,” said Javelosa, whose prize was a year’s worth of free rice.

“I’ll be back next year,” Lee vowed.

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The Hawaii Rice Festival helps to support Lanakila Meals on Wheels in 5th annual event (Hawaii News Now)

The Hawaii Rice Festival helps to support Lanakila Meals on Wheels in 5th annual event (Hawaii News Now)

Source: Hawaii News Now

The Hawaii Rice Festival helps to support Lanakila Meals on Wheels in 5th annual event (Hawaii News Now)

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –
The 5th annual Hawaii Rice Festival takes place this weekend. There will be food, music, games, and of course, a lot of rice.

Aries Jackson, World Hunger Relief Ambassador for Yum Brands; where they’ll be accepting donations of rice for Lanakila Meals on Wheels, is here on Sunrise to talk more about the event.

Performing at the event is Streetlight Cadence, here with a preview performance.

The Hawaii Rice Festival takes place on Sunday, September 28th at Ward Center from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free.

For more information click HERE.

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